Building Nova Earth: Toward A World That Works for Everyone

Sword and Shield? Against Whom?

I’m rapidly recovering from my turtle time (sigh…), which has allowed me to catch up on some of my reading and I wanted to comment on two items.

The first is Archangel Michael’s interview from Hour with an Angel on Dec. 26 and the second is the Project Camelot Whistleblower radio program with David Wilcock, which at last I’ve had the chance to read, straggling behind the pack to do so. Let me comment on AAM today and David tomorrow.

I’ve never worked with a kinder or wiser boss than AAM. I’ve watched how he phrases things with me and the people I work with and marvelled at the manner in which he takes a person’s vasanas and shows how they can be made into virtues.

One person’s tendency to worry makes him an ideal watchdog.  Another person’s thrown (1)  concern for social justice makes him an ideal ombudsman.  Werner Erhard used to advise us to co-opt our critics by appointing them in charge of the area they see clearly in. AAM makes that the ultimate art.

Specifically what I wanted to draw attention to was this passage in his message:

“I wish tonight to reach into your hearts – yes, as I ignite the blue flame once again of truth – but to truly ignite the flame of inner peace. I ask you, I encourage you, I urge you – I beg you, pick up your sword and shield that I have gifted you so long ago and wield them.

“This is not simply a defensive posture. It is the declaration of who you are in awakening peace within your heart. I also wish to awaken fully your warrior self. When you are in peace, it is not simply a blissful, quiet place, it is a place where there is no fear, where there is no worry, where there is no anger, where there is no frustration, that there is only the clarity of your soul.”

Pick up our sword and shield against whom? How can a warrior of peace assume a warlike stance, a defensive posture? I’d like to say two things about that, one derived from karate and one from growth work.

Anyone who has studied karate will know that all karate responses begin with a defensive move. A punch comes in, or a kick comes in and the karate student responds with a block. But it isn’t until the first time a person is required to use their karate skills that they realize the manner in which they’ve been trained. If one is taught to respond only with a defensive move, one has been inconspicuously trained not to attack.

I had no training in how to attack another. If the person attacking me abandoned their intention, nothing ever got started because I was trained only to initiate by defending. Here too Archangel Michael is not trying to invite us to attack but to defend ourselves, in the same way the karate instructor did.

But who have we taken up sword and shield against? Someone out there? Probably not. More likely someone in here. Who is it that fears, worries, and gets angry? It’s the ego. The Self has no fear and no reason to fear. The Self has no worry and no reason to worry. And the Self does not anger and has no reason for anger. Only the ego does.

So, yes, we may need to yield the sword and shield against attack from outside. It could happen. But principally the chief violator of the peace is our own ego. And if we restrict matters to ourselves alone and leave others out of the equation for the moment, then the violator of the peace is always only our own ego.

Nowhere has that become more obvious to me than in the present work I’m involved in. I watch my own ego become territorial. I watch it want to conserve all the glory to itself. I watch it strut and sing its own praises. And I take up the sword and shield that AAM has given all of us starseeds and I take a stand against my own ego. And every time I do, after the fact, I see how mistaken was my ego’s appraisal of the situation and how well it worked out when I didn’t listen to it. But it takes a struggle to unhitch from the mischief maker.

Let me stop there for now and in a second post tomorrow look at one of the interesting revelations in  David’s Project Camelot interview. Yes, the concerted effort of lightworkers and insiders may have saved David from a terrible fate, but his revelations have also provided us with some valuable insights into NESARA and the New Society.

Footnotes

(1) A “thrown” concern is a concern that springs from a vasana or automatic tendency. It is usually an unexamined concern.

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