Building Nova Earth: Toward A World That Works for Everyone

Cloning – Part 3/5 – The Question of a Soul

(For Part 2, see http://goldenageofgaia.com/nwo-essays/cloning-part-2-world-leaders/.)

Hugo looks at whether clones have souls and why the public, when Dolly the sheep was cloned, did not inquire about the use of the process with humans.

From Matthew Ward, Revelations for a New Era: Keys to Restoring Paradise on Earth. Channeled by Suzy Ward. Camas, WA: Matthew Books, 2001; rev. 2009, 155-8.

Hugo: Now to continue. I shall address the very important matter of a soul in a cloned body. As for a soul being or not being in these man-made bodies, most definitely, no soul is “born” in a cloned individual, but a soul may choose to enter one. There is good reason for a soul to enter, just as there is good reason for a soul not to.

For a soul who has been waiting to experience in physical form, it is an opportunity to do so in these waning days before great changes within God’s plan for raising consciousness of the planet and all of you who are receptive. However, any soul who enters these cloned bodies knows the risk of becoming trapped by the dark forces that have pervaded the psyche of the original person and any predecessor clones. This is a particularly important consideration as brain functioning deteriorates with each downloading process, as I have mentioned, and thereby weakens a soul’s mental resistance to becoming trapped. Also, in later versions of the clones, longevity is not long, so those bodies are not looked upon as the paradise life one might suspect of an individual in a highly influential position.

Why would any soul take on such a problem? The power of such an influential position is exactly why some souls are not only willing, they are eager to enter the clone. They do so with the determination to overcome the genetic structure, the influence of the memory, and the inherent tendency to follow the negative path that the original soul was on. When a soul is very strong indeed, there is the will to uplift the genetic and moral character to the point that there does seem to be a turnabout in the “person’s” health, attitudes and activities. In such cases, it is because the stronger soul’s higher intention attracts the higher light energy that enables it to infuse the cloned body with physical stamina not available to those souls with less resolve, and therefore the stronger soul can sustain the body’s life force for a much longer period than a weaker soul can.

Now you are thinking, how can any body live without a soul? The chemical makeup of a physical body is such that it is an independently functioning entity. Its life force is sustained by its own energetic momentum derived from the elements and interacting processes of normal organic functioning. Therefore, a clone without a soul has the same mobility and thinking capacity as any normal body.

Let us address what is not in a clone without a soul. First, emotions are not the givens they are in a naturally created human. A soul-less clone has to acquire the appearance of emotions in accordance with its surroundings, perhaps what is expected of a “regular guy” or maybe a member of high society. It is only conformance to the circle in which the clone moves that gives it the appearance of having emotions.

But the most essential lack in a clone is the spiritual aspect that is inherent in a baby born from the egg and sperm of its parents. The soul life force encompasses those aspects of being that are the bonding with God—conscience, intuition, sense of self at a higher plane than normal conscious functioning. So, neither those ties with God nor natural emotions are within the soul-less cloned individual. Instead, there is a mechanical and mental aspect of what is appropriate to do or say. Once mastered, that ability is as proficient as if the “person” had spent a lifetime accumulating wisdom and behaving properly.

Your mind is so full of questions, Madam! No, producing what you call “test tube babies” is not in the least the same nature as cloning individuals, and most surely not in purpose.

S: I’m sorry about thinking of so many things to ask you, Hugo. Since it’s public knowledge that a sheep has just been cloned, do you know why people en masse haven’t questioned whether the same can be done with humans?

Hugo: Well, Madam, I’d say that even though the cloning of the animal is known, there will be no sustained information on that accomplishment. The art of cloning has not been perfected there, and the products will not age in the same normal way naturally-conceived animals do. When this is realized, there may not be many reports on it. Also I’d say that concentrated publicity could logically cause all thinking individuals to extrapolate that achievement into the possibility of human cloning. That kind of speculation does indeed exist there, but to prevent the major populace accepting such a feat as a possibility, much less a validity, science fiction in books and films is the masterful means whereby the human cloning technology is confined to entertainment, and always in a tenor of absurdity.

(For Part 4, see http://goldenageofgaia.com/nwo-essays/cloning-part-45-origins-of-cloning/.)

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